This year has been particularly positive for Blockchain adoptions. Researchers from the University of Waterloo (Canada) integrated the use of blockchain technology in electric vehicle power systems to improve the infrastructure of their cargo, as reported on August 14 in a press release from EurekAlert.

The report indicates that the study describes a new charging system based on blockchain technology, so researchers found that there is a lack of trust between charging service providers, owners, and owners of electric vehicles (EV).

Researchers point out that with the use of an open blockchain platform, the parties involved in the upload process will have access to the data and will be able to verify if they were altered.

According to the source, using a blockchain-oriented charging system will allow electric vehicle owners to see if they are overcharged, while owners will know if they are being paid less.

The study has been officially recognized as “Mitigating confidence issues in the charging of electric vehicles using a blockchain” and was written by researchers at the Waterloo Mathematics Faculty, Christian Gorenflo, Srinivasan Keshav and Lukasz Golab of the Faculty Engineering

Christian Gorenflo, a Ph.D. candidate at the David R. Cheriton School of Waterloo, said that energy services are increasingly being provided by entities that do not have well-established relationships of trust with their clients and partners, which would have been bringing the need to improve internal policies within electricity companies. This would obviously need a general change within the system.

In addition, Gorenflo explained that blockchains are a viable alternative since in that context “they are a promising approach to replace a central trust part, for example, which makes it possible to implement direct energy trade between peers.”

The study has been officially recognized as “Mitigating confidence issues in the charging of electric vehicles using a blockchain” and was written by researchers at the Waterloo Mathematics Faculty, Christian Gorenflo, Srinivasan Keshav and Lukasz Golab of the Faculty Engineering

Analyzing the study

In order to carry out the study, the group of researchers established a collaboration with an electric vehicle charging service provider. The process consists of the provider working directly with the owners to install the electric vehicle supply equipment used by the electric vehicle owners for a fee.

Next, the revenue stream of these charging stations is shared between the cargo service provider and each owner. The EV supply team is operated by the charging service provider, so owners must rely on the provider to compensate them fairly for the used electricity.

According to the source, the study allowed researchers to identify three necessary procedures for incorporating blockchain technology into the energy system:

  1. Identify the parties involved and their relationships of trust. If the level of trust in a relationship is insufficient to achieve the goal of the application or if it restricts an action necessary to achieve that goal, this should be recorded as a trust issue.
  2. Design a minimum blockchain system, including smart contracts, to solve the trust issues identified in the first step. If it is necessary to replace parts of an inherited system, the new system must closely mimic existing interfaces so that dependencies can continue to function with minimal modifications.
  3. With a blockchain that mitigates trust, the rest of the system can be visualized over time. This allows the business model to eventually grow from a legacy blockchain hybrid to a truly decentralized solution.

Gorenflo says that the use of blockchain could boost a system that has communication between machines without the intervention of human beings.

“If an autonomous vehicle needs power, it could detect it and drive to the nearest charging station and communicate on a platform with that charging station for power.”

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